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One of the most important anthologies of ballads is F. More recent ballads from the 18th century and the Scottish borderlands include "Sir Patrick Spens," "Tam Lin," and "Thomas the Rhymer." See also ballade and common measure., "Mais ou sont les nieges d'antan? ") The ballade first rose to prominence in the 14th and 15th centuries, popularized by French poets like Guillaume de Machaut and Eustache Deschampes. Works written in ballad measure often include such quatrains.

It was perfected in the 16th century by François Villon, but it later fell into disrepute when 17th century poets like Moliere and Boileau mocked its conventions. As an example, the opening stanza to "Earl Brand" illustrates the pattern.

The story of Christ's death and resurrection seemed merely an echo of hundreds of similar myths compiled in James Frazer's . This argument is what finally persuaded Lewis to convert.

: In common parlance, song hits, folk music, and folktales or any song that tells a story are loosely called ballads.

If a barrow is built out of piled stones rather than loose dirt, is is technically a (a long thin hill usually containing several burials in passage graves).Note also the bits of Scottish dialect in phrases such as "hae" for BARD (Welsh Bardd, Irish Bard): (1) An ancient Celtic poet, singer and harpist who recited heroic poems by memory.These bards were the oral historians, political critics, eulogizers, and entertainers of their ancient societies.The Balder myth has many analogues in mythology and world religion, i.e., tales in which a just, virtuous, beautiful or well-loved deity ends up dying unfairly in a manner that grieves the heavens and earth. Lewis wrote of how he loved Balder before he loved Christ (i.e., converted to Christianity). Tolkien, a devout Catholic, sought to convert Lewis to Christianity.Key instances are the legends of consort-deities like Adonis in ancient Greece or Tammuz in the ancient Middle East, or in the New Testament tradition, the sacrificial death of Christ. As an atheist before his conversion, Lewis struggled with the fact that precursors and analogues to the Christian narrative long predated the New Testament account, which made Lewis doubt the historicity of the Gospel narratives. Tolkien's argument was basically that, while it was historically certain that analogues to the Christ-tale preexisted (and may have influenced) the accounts in the gospels, God took the human myths and made them literally real in the story of Christ, i.e, that the older myths were symptomatic of human desires for forgiveness, grace, and wondrous resurrection, and that God took the human stories, with their archetypes, symbols, and wish fulfillment, and designed his plan for salvation as a literal enactment of these older myths, finally giving us what humans had always sought in the pagan legends.

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